Title

Don’t Meth with it: A look at the Methamphetamine Epidemic

Date

5-29-2014 11:15 AM

End Time

29-5-2014 12:00 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Arelene Courtney

Session Title

Chemistry Capstone Seminars

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Arlene Courtney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Methamphetamine is a stimulant that was originally used to keep soldiers in WWII from feeling fatigued. Once people around the world started abusing it as a recreational drug it became hard to control. Methamphetamine alters the chemistry of the brain, making it more and more difficult to achieve the high that users experience the first time they use the drug. Methamphetamine use changes the physical appearance of a person, damaging their teeth and skin. Methamphetamine can be synthesized from pseudoephedrine an ingredient cold medicines such as Sudafed. This has made it difficult to control clandestine labs and methamphetamine use forcing officials to change methamphetamine to a schedule I drug and Sudafed to a prescription drug in many states, including Oregon. Methamphetamine can be detected inside and outside the body using instrumentation such as Gas-Chromatography/Mass-Spectrometry (GC-MS), High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR).

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May 29th, 11:15 AM May 29th, 12:00 PM

Don’t Meth with it: A look at the Methamphetamine Epidemic

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Methamphetamine is a stimulant that was originally used to keep soldiers in WWII from feeling fatigued. Once people around the world started abusing it as a recreational drug it became hard to control. Methamphetamine alters the chemistry of the brain, making it more and more difficult to achieve the high that users experience the first time they use the drug. Methamphetamine use changes the physical appearance of a person, damaging their teeth and skin. Methamphetamine can be synthesized from pseudoephedrine an ingredient cold medicines such as Sudafed. This has made it difficult to control clandestine labs and methamphetamine use forcing officials to change methamphetamine to a schedule I drug and Sudafed to a prescription drug in many states, including Oregon. Methamphetamine can be detected inside and outside the body using instrumentation such as Gas-Chromatography/Mass-Spectrometry (GC-MS), High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR).