Title

Determining the Effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Drosophila melanogaster

Date

5-29-2014 2:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens has been shown to cause an immune response in D. melanogaster larvae that can lead to both death and delayed developmental growth, but little is known about what biological factors associated with P. fluorescens cause these immune responses in D. melanogaster. This current study sought to determine whether the bacteria P. fluorescens itself triggers the immune response in fly larvae, or whether the response was due to secreted metabolites produced by the bacteria. To determine this, different strains of P. fluorescens that lacked certain metabolites (e.g., Pf-5 strain, A506 strain, SWB25 strain, and GAC mutant strains) were mixed into yeast fed to the fly larvae. Larvae were placed on plates and monitored throughout developmental stages, up to adulthood, for both rate of development and rate of death. Certain strains of P. fluorescens lacking specific metabolites showed a small, but significant difference in both death rates and developmental delay when compared to controls, while other strains showed large significant developmental delay and increased death rates. These results suggest that specific metabolites can be implicated in the immune response seen in D. melanogaster.

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May 29th, 2:00 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

Determining the Effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Drosophila melanogaster

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

The bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens has been shown to cause an immune response in D. melanogaster larvae that can lead to both death and delayed developmental growth, but little is known about what biological factors associated with P. fluorescens cause these immune responses in D. melanogaster. This current study sought to determine whether the bacteria P. fluorescens itself triggers the immune response in fly larvae, or whether the response was due to secreted metabolites produced by the bacteria. To determine this, different strains of P. fluorescens that lacked certain metabolites (e.g., Pf-5 strain, A506 strain, SWB25 strain, and GAC mutant strains) were mixed into yeast fed to the fly larvae. Larvae were placed on plates and monitored throughout developmental stages, up to adulthood, for both rate of development and rate of death. Certain strains of P. fluorescens lacking specific metabolites showed a small, but significant difference in both death rates and developmental delay when compared to controls, while other strains showed large significant developmental delay and increased death rates. These results suggest that specific metabolites can be implicated in the immune response seen in D. melanogaster.