Title

The Effects of UV-B Radiation on the Growth and Functionality of Kale (Brassica oleracea Acephala)

Date

5-29-2014 2:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

UV-B radiation exposure on plants causes abnormal formation of plant structures and decreased ability to perform functions. The effects that plant species experience from UV-B exposure are still unknown. Here we tested the impact on growth and function of daily UV-B exposure for intervals of 15 seconds on five Brassica oleracea Acephala (Kale). The experimental kale showed greater average heights and greater stomatal densities (adaxial, 60%; abaxial, 85%) compared to controls (adaxial, P<0.05; abaxial, P<0.005). Minimum conductance, dark adapted pressure potential and average SLA (Specific Leaf Area) all showed no significant difference between the experimental and control kale (P>0.05). However, the experimental kale showed significantly less negative light adapted pressure potentials (average, -0.972MPa) than that of the controls (average, -1.088MPa). We found evidence that supports exposure to daily bursts of UV-B positively affected plant growth but found no evidence to support the negatively affected pressure potentials in neither the experimental kale nor the functionality of the structures where the unforeseen pressure potentials resulted.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 29th, 2:00 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

The Effects of UV-B Radiation on the Growth and Functionality of Kale (Brassica oleracea Acephala)

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

UV-B radiation exposure on plants causes abnormal formation of plant structures and decreased ability to perform functions. The effects that plant species experience from UV-B exposure are still unknown. Here we tested the impact on growth and function of daily UV-B exposure for intervals of 15 seconds on five Brassica oleracea Acephala (Kale). The experimental kale showed greater average heights and greater stomatal densities (adaxial, 60%; abaxial, 85%) compared to controls (adaxial, P<0.05; abaxial, P<0.005). Minimum conductance, dark adapted pressure potential and average SLA (Specific Leaf Area) all showed no significant difference between the experimental and control kale (P>0.05). However, the experimental kale showed significantly less negative light adapted pressure potentials (average, -0.972MPa) than that of the controls (average, -1.088MPa). We found evidence that supports exposure to daily bursts of UV-B positively affected plant growth but found no evidence to support the negatively affected pressure potentials in neither the experimental kale nor the functionality of the structures where the unforeseen pressure potentials resulted.