Title

Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Response to Hypoxic Stress

Date

5-29-2014 2:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Earth is experiencing climate change that may impact our ability to grow crops efficiently and economically, threatening our food supply. To understand how flooding impacts tomato, we grew tomato in a hypoxic simulated environment on a cycle of four consecutive days with roots submerged and three consecutive days of regular drainage. Plants were grown in a Greenhouse and treated equally with all other respects. Hypoxia resulted in overall smaller plants than the control. Hypoxia reduced height by 32% (t8=2.82, P<0.025), but increased the maximum photosynthetic rate by 90% (t8=27.8, P<0.005) and the specific leaf area by 51% (t8=7.33,P<0.005). Water potential, stomatal density, and the minimum transpiration rate were not significantly different between treatments (all P>0.05). Our results support that hypoxia decreases tomato growth. Further study should determine the best water conditions for achieving high crop yields economically.

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May 29th, 2:00 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Response to Hypoxic Stress

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Earth is experiencing climate change that may impact our ability to grow crops efficiently and economically, threatening our food supply. To understand how flooding impacts tomato, we grew tomato in a hypoxic simulated environment on a cycle of four consecutive days with roots submerged and three consecutive days of regular drainage. Plants were grown in a Greenhouse and treated equally with all other respects. Hypoxia resulted in overall smaller plants than the control. Hypoxia reduced height by 32% (t8=2.82, P<0.025), but increased the maximum photosynthetic rate by 90% (t8=27.8, P<0.005) and the specific leaf area by 51% (t8=7.33,P<0.005). Water potential, stomatal density, and the minimum transpiration rate were not significantly different between treatments (all P>0.05). Our results support that hypoxia decreases tomato growth. Further study should determine the best water conditions for achieving high crop yields economically.