Title

The Effect of Stream Size on Enteric and Pseudomonad Bacteria Concentrations

Date

5-29-2014 2:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Sarah Boomer

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Enterics are Gram-negative bacteria found normally or pathogenically in the intestines of humans and animals. Pseudomonads are another type of Gram-negative bacteria that are often found in soil. Both of these bacteria have the ability to contaminate water sources making them unsafe. MacConkey media is typically used by health officials to test for these gram-negative contaminants. We tested to see if the stream size of the water source had an effect on the concentration of Enteric and Pseudomonad bacteria. Water samples were taken from the Willamette River and Rickreall Creek and then plated on MacConkey media. Representative colonies were then isolated and put through a series of additional classification tests to compare the diversity levels in each water source. We found that the Willamette River contained significantly more bacteria than Rickreall Creek. However, Rickreall Creek revealed more diversity within the types of bacteria present. Our results indicated that there is a positive correlation between the stream size and the concentration of Enteric and Pseudomonad bacteria.

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May 29th, 2:00 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

The Effect of Stream Size on Enteric and Pseudomonad Bacteria Concentrations

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Enterics are Gram-negative bacteria found normally or pathogenically in the intestines of humans and animals. Pseudomonads are another type of Gram-negative bacteria that are often found in soil. Both of these bacteria have the ability to contaminate water sources making them unsafe. MacConkey media is typically used by health officials to test for these gram-negative contaminants. We tested to see if the stream size of the water source had an effect on the concentration of Enteric and Pseudomonad bacteria. Water samples were taken from the Willamette River and Rickreall Creek and then plated on MacConkey media. Representative colonies were then isolated and put through a series of additional classification tests to compare the diversity levels in each water source. We found that the Willamette River contained significantly more bacteria than Rickreall Creek. However, Rickreall Creek revealed more diversity within the types of bacteria present. Our results indicated that there is a positive correlation between the stream size and the concentration of Enteric and Pseudomonad bacteria.