Title

Effects of Shading on Zea mays (Corn)

Date

5-29-2014 2:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Shading is a common threat among many plant species, usually due to competition with neighboring individuals. Plants have evolved varying techniques, such as increasing surface area and producing less dry matter, to combat low light conditions. Shade effects were measured in Zea mays (corn) grown under greenhouse conditions. Mesh wiring was used to simulate shade conditions, here defined as 11% light availability compared to control plants. Photosynthesis, conductance, and transpiration measures were performed with a gas-exchange instrument (LI-6400) while leaf surface area and stomatal density were gathered from selected leaf sections. Shade treatment reduced plant biomass (P<0.001) and increased the minimum transpiration rate (P<0.05). Shade had a significantly lower stalk diameter than control (P<0.001). Shade had a higher leaf surface area than the control (P<0.001). Our findings corroborate previous research showing decreased growth in shoot production while increasing leaf surface area as a productive method of combating limited light resources. This research elucidates growing patterns and the effects varying light has on corn yields

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May 29th, 2:00 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

Effects of Shading on Zea mays (Corn)

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Shading is a common threat among many plant species, usually due to competition with neighboring individuals. Plants have evolved varying techniques, such as increasing surface area and producing less dry matter, to combat low light conditions. Shade effects were measured in Zea mays (corn) grown under greenhouse conditions. Mesh wiring was used to simulate shade conditions, here defined as 11% light availability compared to control plants. Photosynthesis, conductance, and transpiration measures were performed with a gas-exchange instrument (LI-6400) while leaf surface area and stomatal density were gathered from selected leaf sections. Shade treatment reduced plant biomass (P<0.001) and increased the minimum transpiration rate (P<0.05). Shade had a significantly lower stalk diameter than control (P<0.001). Shade had a higher leaf surface area than the control (P<0.001). Our findings corroborate previous research showing decreased growth in shoot production while increasing leaf surface area as a productive method of combating limited light resources. This research elucidates growing patterns and the effects varying light has on corn yields