Title

Growth of Urban Trees in Response to Rainfall and Temperature

Date

5-29-2014 2:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

As urbanization is occurring, less wild and more urban habitats are available for trees. Determining the relationship between tree growth and climate is the first step to understand how trees thrive in urban habitats. We used basal area increment (BAI), to analyze yearly growth of four species, Pin oak (Quercus palustris), Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and Western redcedar (Thuja plicata), in an urban environment. BAI was compared to climatic variables: yearly total rainfall, average temperature, and average maximum temperature. BAI for all species examined was not correlated (P>.05) to any of the climatic variables. However, the sensitivity index of Douglas fir was more than three times higher than the other species, indicating greater interannual variability in BAI. This study indicates that in this urban environment there may be other factors causing trees to not follow the expected trend of increased growth with increased rainfall and temperature. Further studies should be conducted to determine these other factors, such as possibly; irrigation, light pollution, and heat island effect.

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May 29th, 2:00 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

Growth of Urban Trees in Response to Rainfall and Temperature

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

As urbanization is occurring, less wild and more urban habitats are available for trees. Determining the relationship between tree growth and climate is the first step to understand how trees thrive in urban habitats. We used basal area increment (BAI), to analyze yearly growth of four species, Pin oak (Quercus palustris), Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and Western redcedar (Thuja plicata), in an urban environment. BAI was compared to climatic variables: yearly total rainfall, average temperature, and average maximum temperature. BAI for all species examined was not correlated (P>.05) to any of the climatic variables. However, the sensitivity index of Douglas fir was more than three times higher than the other species, indicating greater interannual variability in BAI. This study indicates that in this urban environment there may be other factors causing trees to not follow the expected trend of increased growth with increased rainfall and temperature. Further studies should be conducted to determine these other factors, such as possibly; irrigation, light pollution, and heat island effect.