Title

Theories of the State of Nature: Can Both Hobbes and Locke Be Correct?

Date

5-29-2014 1:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 1:30 PM

Location

Bellamy Hall (HSS) 336

Department

Philosophy

Session Chair

Ryan Hickerson

Session Title

Philosophy Department, Senior Theses

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ryan Hickerson

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

State of Nature theories enable a clearer perspective on why the state exists and what type of state would best suit the needs of the people who live under it. Thomas Hobbes and John Locke hold widely diverging ideas of what the State of Nature would be. It is commonly held that either the Hobbesian or Lockean State of Nature theory is correct, but not both. In this paper I argue that the State of Nature theories offered by Hobbes and Locke are not mutually exclusive: both are applicable and can exist simultaneously in relation to different people and different societies.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 29th, 1:00 PM May 29th, 1:30 PM

Theories of the State of Nature: Can Both Hobbes and Locke Be Correct?

Bellamy Hall (HSS) 336

State of Nature theories enable a clearer perspective on why the state exists and what type of state would best suit the needs of the people who live under it. Thomas Hobbes and John Locke hold widely diverging ideas of what the State of Nature would be. It is commonly held that either the Hobbesian or Lockean State of Nature theory is correct, but not both. In this paper I argue that the State of Nature theories offered by Hobbes and Locke are not mutually exclusive: both are applicable and can exist simultaneously in relation to different people and different societies.