Title

Delayed Gratification and Trust, is there a Connection?

Date

5-29-2014 9:00 AM

End Time

29-5-2014 11:00 AM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Psychology

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. Chehalis Strapp

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This research predicted that participants would accept a delayed reward from a trustworthy person, as opposed to an untrustworthy person. Using a within subjects design, twenty participants including 15 females and 5 males (M = 25.5 years, SD = 7.02) were randomly presented with either a trustworthy or untrustworthy person first. They then read a character depiction matching each face, and answered twenty questions, which offered either smaller immediate rewards or larger delayed rewards. Participants opted for a delayed hypothetical monetary reward if the person was trustworthy. These results suggest that trust influences an individual’s ability to delay gratification.

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May 29th, 9:00 AM May 29th, 11:00 AM

Delayed Gratification and Trust, is there a Connection?

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

This research predicted that participants would accept a delayed reward from a trustworthy person, as opposed to an untrustworthy person. Using a within subjects design, twenty participants including 15 females and 5 males (M = 25.5 years, SD = 7.02) were randomly presented with either a trustworthy or untrustworthy person first. They then read a character depiction matching each face, and answered twenty questions, which offered either smaller immediate rewards or larger delayed rewards. Participants opted for a delayed hypothetical monetary reward if the person was trustworthy. These results suggest that trust influences an individual’s ability to delay gratification.