Title

Rise of an African American Mythos

Date

5-29-2014 10:33 AM

End Time

29-5-2014 10:43 AM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 205

Department

English, Writing and Linguistics

Session Chair

Marjory Lange

Session Title

English: Linguistics, Literature, Writing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Christine Harvey Horning

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Written in an artistic explosion among the African American community known as the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston’s 1937 novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, represents a cultural contribution which significantly advances the equality of African Americans and women. It goes beyond this contribution as well by crafting a new mythology shaped by a recent past that includes government sanctioned Jim Crow laws and the collective experience of slavery among members of Hurston’s community. The novel and its author stand as a cultural pivot point in America. Where previously African American artists had been limited by white American expectations and even their own self-repression, Hurston elevates her narrative beyond these limits, acknowledging the struggles of the community but using them as a strength and a right to embrace the reality of their burgeoning freedom and to claim a unique but universal spiritual identity.

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May 29th, 10:33 AM May 29th, 10:43 AM

Rise of an African American Mythos

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 205

Written in an artistic explosion among the African American community known as the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston’s 1937 novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, represents a cultural contribution which significantly advances the equality of African Americans and women. It goes beyond this contribution as well by crafting a new mythology shaped by a recent past that includes government sanctioned Jim Crow laws and the collective experience of slavery among members of Hurston’s community. The novel and its author stand as a cultural pivot point in America. Where previously African American artists had been limited by white American expectations and even their own self-repression, Hurston elevates her narrative beyond these limits, acknowledging the struggles of the community but using them as a strength and a right to embrace the reality of their burgeoning freedom and to claim a unique but universal spiritual identity.