Title

Slowing the Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease by Increasing Cerebral Blood Flow

Date

5-29-2014 9:00 AM

End Time

29-5-2014 11:00 AM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Health, Physical Education and Exercise Science

Session Chair

Daryl Thomas

Session Chair

Janet Roberts

Session Chair

Natalie DeWitt

Session Title

Health/ Physical Education/Exercise Science Poster Session

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Siobhan Maty

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

More than five million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It is a condition characterized by progressive disorientation, confusion, memory failure, and many other related symptoms. Vascular risk factors are strongly linked with AD. There is a higher rate of cognitive and functional decline in individuals who present with one or more vascular risk factors. We proposed a study that would increase patients’ cerebral blood flow through repositioning and by the performance of simple movements. We anticipate that through these interventions, patients will exhibit a measurable increase in cerebral blood flow, thus slowing the onset and progression of AD.

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May 29th, 9:00 AM May 29th, 11:00 AM

Slowing the Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease by Increasing Cerebral Blood Flow

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

More than five million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It is a condition characterized by progressive disorientation, confusion, memory failure, and many other related symptoms. Vascular risk factors are strongly linked with AD. There is a higher rate of cognitive and functional decline in individuals who present with one or more vascular risk factors. We proposed a study that would increase patients’ cerebral blood flow through repositioning and by the performance of simple movements. We anticipate that through these interventions, patients will exhibit a measurable increase in cerebral blood flow, thus slowing the onset and progression of AD.