Title

A Tentative Alliance: Tito-Khrushchev and the Narratives Behind the Kidnapping of Imre Nagy

Date

5-29-2014 3:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 3:30 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

History

Session Chair

John L. Rector

Session Title

History Master Degree Papers

Faculty Sponsor(s)

David Doellinger

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In 1956 the people of Hungary rose up against their Stalinist leadership and appointed the reform-socialist Imre Nagy as their prime minister for the second time. The Soviet Union responded by invading Budapest November 4, 1956. Nagy was forced to flee to the nearby embassy of Yugoslavia to avoid being captured by the Soviet forces. Ultimately, Yugoslavia's Jozip Broz Tito attempted to have Nagy flown safely to Sarajevo so he could live out his days in peace, but Nagy was kidnapped on the way out of the country and eventually executed by the Soviet Union under Nikita Khrushchev. This paper focuses on the negotiations behind the scenes between two hesitant allies in Tito and Khrushchev about how to treat the Hungarian Revolution and the extremely tense talks between the two nations as they attempted to rebuild relations after the death of Stalin, culminating in the experiment of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

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May 29th, 3:00 PM May 29th, 3:30 PM

A Tentative Alliance: Tito-Khrushchev and the Narratives Behind the Kidnapping of Imre Nagy

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

In 1956 the people of Hungary rose up against their Stalinist leadership and appointed the reform-socialist Imre Nagy as their prime minister for the second time. The Soviet Union responded by invading Budapest November 4, 1956. Nagy was forced to flee to the nearby embassy of Yugoslavia to avoid being captured by the Soviet forces. Ultimately, Yugoslavia's Jozip Broz Tito attempted to have Nagy flown safely to Sarajevo so he could live out his days in peace, but Nagy was kidnapped on the way out of the country and eventually executed by the Soviet Union under Nikita Khrushchev. This paper focuses on the negotiations behind the scenes between two hesitant allies in Tito and Khrushchev about how to treat the Hungarian Revolution and the extremely tense talks between the two nations as they attempted to rebuild relations after the death of Stalin, culminating in the experiment of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.