Title

Tito’s War of Words: The Social Consequences of Yugoslavia’s Expulsion from the Soviet Bloc, 1948-1950

Date

5-29-2014 2:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 2:30 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

History

Session Chair

John L. Rector

Session Title

History Master Degree Papers

Faculty Sponsor(s)

David Doellinger

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This paper examines the conflict between Tito and Stalin in the Communist Information Bureau, or Cominform, and how that conflict forced Yugoslavs to reevaluate how they had perceived their relationship with the Soviet Union and their position within the larger community of communist parties. This conflict played out in the correspondence exchanged between the two countries' leaderships and culminated with Yugoslavia's expulsion from the Cominform. The Yugoslav communists saw themselves as part of an expansive international movement in which they played an important part and through which they hoped to develop their own country. This was not how the Soviets viewed Yugoslavia and the other countries in the Eastern Bloc. This fundamental disconnect over the roles each expected the other to play created an opportunity for Yugoslav society to look inward and to reassess how to continue building a socialist state without the internationalist elements that had seemed crucial to success.

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May 29th, 2:00 PM May 29th, 2:30 PM

Tito’s War of Words: The Social Consequences of Yugoslavia’s Expulsion from the Soviet Bloc, 1948-1950

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

This paper examines the conflict between Tito and Stalin in the Communist Information Bureau, or Cominform, and how that conflict forced Yugoslavs to reevaluate how they had perceived their relationship with the Soviet Union and their position within the larger community of communist parties. This conflict played out in the correspondence exchanged between the two countries' leaderships and culminated with Yugoslavia's expulsion from the Cominform. The Yugoslav communists saw themselves as part of an expansive international movement in which they played an important part and through which they hoped to develop their own country. This was not how the Soviets viewed Yugoslavia and the other countries in the Eastern Bloc. This fundamental disconnect over the roles each expected the other to play created an opportunity for Yugoslav society to look inward and to reassess how to continue building a socialist state without the internationalist elements that had seemed crucial to success.