Title

The Effects of Collaborative Discussion on Individual Recall Capabilties

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Psychology

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Title

Psychology Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Chehalis Strapp

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Effects of group collaboration on individuals’ recall capability were studied from an experimental perspective. Contradictory theories on collaborative learning have raised concerns (Basden, Bryner & Thomas, 1997). Researchers suggested that collaboration among group members had negative results on memory; most group members are social loafing, free riding and lack effort (Blumen & Rajaram 2008). Conversely, researchers proved that positive interaction is fundamental for individual recall (Rajaram & Pasarin, 2007). It was hypothesized that sixty participants (30 female, 30 male) with a mean age of 26 years (SD= 4.814) from the Willamette Valley engaged in collaborative discussion would recall more words than individuals who did not engage in discussion. Findings implied that collaborative discussion influenced individuals’ recall capabilities.

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May 30th, 2:00 PM

The Effects of Collaborative Discussion on Individual Recall Capabilties

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Effects of group collaboration on individuals’ recall capability were studied from an experimental perspective. Contradictory theories on collaborative learning have raised concerns (Basden, Bryner & Thomas, 1997). Researchers suggested that collaboration among group members had negative results on memory; most group members are social loafing, free riding and lack effort (Blumen & Rajaram 2008). Conversely, researchers proved that positive interaction is fundamental for individual recall (Rajaram & Pasarin, 2007). It was hypothesized that sixty participants (30 female, 30 male) with a mean age of 26 years (SD= 4.814) from the Willamette Valley engaged in collaborative discussion would recall more words than individuals who did not engage in discussion. Findings implied that collaborative discussion influenced individuals’ recall capabilities.