Title

Dialectic Thinking and its Effect on Self Esteem as a measure of Ethical Dissonance

Date

5-30-2013 9:00 AM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Psychology

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Title

Psychology Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Chehalis Strapp

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This research hypothesized that within voting behaviors, higher levels of Dialectic Thinking lead to lower levels of Ethical Dissonance when measured via self esteem. Using a within-subjects design, 40 participants, including 25 females and 15 males (M=20.3 years, SD=1.4) completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSS) both pre- and post-test, along with the Dialectical Self Scale (DSS). Participants then completed a survey comparing their voting behaviors to the voting history of the 2012 Presidential candidates. The participants with higher scores on the DSS reported higher post test scores on the RSS. These findings suggest that Dialectic Thinking negatively influences Ethical Dissonance.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
May 30th, 9:00 AM

Dialectic Thinking and its Effect on Self Esteem as a measure of Ethical Dissonance

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

This research hypothesized that within voting behaviors, higher levels of Dialectic Thinking lead to lower levels of Ethical Dissonance when measured via self esteem. Using a within-subjects design, 40 participants, including 25 females and 15 males (M=20.3 years, SD=1.4) completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSS) both pre- and post-test, along with the Dialectical Self Scale (DSS). Participants then completed a survey comparing their voting behaviors to the voting history of the 2012 Presidential candidates. The participants with higher scores on the DSS reported higher post test scores on the RSS. These findings suggest that Dialectic Thinking negatively influences Ethical Dissonance.