Title

Cognitive Change and Writing about Emotional Experiences

Date

5-30-2013 9:00 AM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Psychology

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Title

Psychology Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ethan McMahan

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This study predicted that writing about positive or traumatic experiences would yield equal increases in well-being. Using a within-subjects design, 30 participants, including 20 females and 10 males (M=21.5 years, SD=1.5) were randomly assigned to write about a positive experience, a traumatic experience, or a neutral topic; participant well-being was measured before and after writing using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985). It is expected that writing about positive or traumatic experiences will yield comparable increases in well-being when compared to a control topic. These results suggest that writing about personal experiences has health benefits.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
May 30th, 9:00 AM

Cognitive Change and Writing about Emotional Experiences

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

This study predicted that writing about positive or traumatic experiences would yield equal increases in well-being. Using a within-subjects design, 30 participants, including 20 females and 10 males (M=21.5 years, SD=1.5) were randomly assigned to write about a positive experience, a traumatic experience, or a neutral topic; participant well-being was measured before and after writing using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985). It is expected that writing about positive or traumatic experiences will yield comparable increases in well-being when compared to a control topic. These results suggest that writing about personal experiences has health benefits.