Title

From Apple Country to Wine Valley: The Walla Walla Valley’s Agricultural Transition and its Effects on the Local Economy and Population

Date

5-30-2013 11:40 AM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

History

Session Chair

Max G. Geier

Session Title

History M.A. Program: Graduate Research Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Max G. Geier

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The transition from the production of food crops such as wheat, apples, peas, and onions to the commercial production of wine in the Walla Walla Valley in Southeastern Washington has caused a perceptible change in the local economy and attitude of the people of the area toward agriculture and its role in the region. This paper examines both the transitions and the forces driving them, as well as the attitude of the local people toward the land and its use and the tourist economy that grew out of the changing ecology of the landscape. The shifts in economic focus behind the agricultural focuses in the Walla Walla Valley have changed and shaped the ways in which people interact with the land, feel about its role in society, and see its place in the future of Walla Walla.

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May 30th, 11:40 AM

From Apple Country to Wine Valley: The Walla Walla Valley’s Agricultural Transition and its Effects on the Local Economy and Population

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

The transition from the production of food crops such as wheat, apples, peas, and onions to the commercial production of wine in the Walla Walla Valley in Southeastern Washington has caused a perceptible change in the local economy and attitude of the people of the area toward agriculture and its role in the region. This paper examines both the transitions and the forces driving them, as well as the attitude of the local people toward the land and its use and the tourist economy that grew out of the changing ecology of the landscape. The shifts in economic focus behind the agricultural focuses in the Walla Walla Valley have changed and shaped the ways in which people interact with the land, feel about its role in society, and see its place in the future of Walla Walla.