Title

A Legacy of Violence, Anonymity, and Silence: American Indian Women and The Rogue River Wars, 1851-1856

Date

5-30-2013 10:50 AM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

History

Session Chair

Max G. Geier

Session Title

History M.A. Program: Graduate Research Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Max G. Geier and Kimberly Jensen

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Rogue River Wars (1851-1856) were an extremely violent time in Oregon's history. Miners, settlers, and Indians all had competing visions of the land and of their rights to it. My narrative revolves around the story of an Indian woman who was raped with impunity by prominent lawyer and politician David Logan in the middle of Jacksonville, Oregon in front of a crowd of male and female onlookers in 1853. Studying the context in which this event was allowed to happen is an important addition to the historiography of the Rogue River Wars, which have yet to include an analysis of the role that sexual violence and gender played in the conflicts.

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May 30th, 10:50 AM

A Legacy of Violence, Anonymity, and Silence: American Indian Women and The Rogue River Wars, 1851-1856

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

The Rogue River Wars (1851-1856) were an extremely violent time in Oregon's history. Miners, settlers, and Indians all had competing visions of the land and of their rights to it. My narrative revolves around the story of an Indian woman who was raped with impunity by prominent lawyer and politician David Logan in the middle of Jacksonville, Oregon in front of a crowd of male and female onlookers in 1853. Studying the context in which this event was allowed to happen is an important addition to the historiography of the Rogue River Wars, which have yet to include an analysis of the role that sexual violence and gender played in the conflicts.