Title

Impact of Regional Climate, Vegetation, and Hydrology on Substrate Stability of Highway 101 at Beverly Beach, Oregon

Date

5-30-2013 10:00 AM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) Room 105

Department

Earth Science

Session Chair

Jeff Myers

Session Title

Earth Science Senior Seminar Research: Geological Hazards Impacting US 101 at Beverly Beach, Oregon, and their Mitigation

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jeff Myers

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Geologic hazards, including coastal erosion, runoff and landslides at and around Beverly Beach, OR, are all impacted by the region’s climate, vegetation, and hydrology. The frequency and severity of these hazards are dependent on the vegetation strength and saturation levels which weaken the underlying substrate. Variables including vegetation root strength may provide a valuable resource for landslide mitigation, especially near areas of high water saturation.

The central Oregon coast, from Yaquina Head to Cape Foulweather receives over five and a half feet (1.75 m) of rainfall annually. Mitigating the effects of the climate has proven problematic, because landslides, such as the ones at Johnson Creek and at Moolack Beach, are still creeping towards the ocean, offsetting US Highway 101, which runs adjacent to the coast through the region.

This project focuses on the impact of vegetation and hydrology on slope stability. Analysis of discharge rates, focusing on creeks and other hydrologically active areas, and measurement of root strength of cliff-top vegetation, will be used to interpret the influence and mitigation potential for the slope beneath Hwy 101.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
May 30th, 10:00 AM

Impact of Regional Climate, Vegetation, and Hydrology on Substrate Stability of Highway 101 at Beverly Beach, Oregon

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) Room 105

Geologic hazards, including coastal erosion, runoff and landslides at and around Beverly Beach, OR, are all impacted by the region’s climate, vegetation, and hydrology. The frequency and severity of these hazards are dependent on the vegetation strength and saturation levels which weaken the underlying substrate. Variables including vegetation root strength may provide a valuable resource for landslide mitigation, especially near areas of high water saturation.

The central Oregon coast, from Yaquina Head to Cape Foulweather receives over five and a half feet (1.75 m) of rainfall annually. Mitigating the effects of the climate has proven problematic, because landslides, such as the ones at Johnson Creek and at Moolack Beach, are still creeping towards the ocean, offsetting US Highway 101, which runs adjacent to the coast through the region.

This project focuses on the impact of vegetation and hydrology on slope stability. Analysis of discharge rates, focusing on creeks and other hydrologically active areas, and measurement of root strength of cliff-top vegetation, will be used to interpret the influence and mitigation potential for the slope beneath Hwy 101.