Title

Failed Mitigation and Remediation of Geologic Hazards near Beverly Beach State Park, Oregon: Implications for Geologic Understanding and Public Policy

Date

5-30-2013 11:15 AM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) Room 105

Department

Earth Science

Session Chair

Jeff Myers

Session Title

Earth Science Senior Seminar Research: Geological Hazards Impacting US 101 at Beverly Beach, Oregon, and their Mitigation

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jeff Myers

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Geologic hazards near Beverly Beach, Oregon coupled with existing public policies have resulted in a number of failed mitigation strategies for US Highway 101. The sedimentology and structural geology of the Astoria Formation and overlying marine terraces in the region create a foundation prone to landslides. The climate and hydrology of coastal Oregon add to the potential for slope failure by increasing pore pressure and saturation. Federal, state, and local governments have used a variety of public policies to both prevent and remediate slope failure including limiting land use, installing culverts, dewatering, and road re-paving. Failed mitigation has resulted from both incomplete geologic studies of the region and public policy incompatible with geologic understanding. In this study, an experimental design assesses how re-pavement of Highway 101 affects the slope stability of the region. Field measurements of asphalt thickness, and cover area will be used to calculate the influence of increased load weight on the slope, and how this affects landslide frequency and magnitude. Results of this experiment can be used to interpret the total long term impacts of current public policies of road remediation versus the higher short term costs of slope mitigation.

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May 30th, 11:15 AM

Failed Mitigation and Remediation of Geologic Hazards near Beverly Beach State Park, Oregon: Implications for Geologic Understanding and Public Policy

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) Room 105

Geologic hazards near Beverly Beach, Oregon coupled with existing public policies have resulted in a number of failed mitigation strategies for US Highway 101. The sedimentology and structural geology of the Astoria Formation and overlying marine terraces in the region create a foundation prone to landslides. The climate and hydrology of coastal Oregon add to the potential for slope failure by increasing pore pressure and saturation. Federal, state, and local governments have used a variety of public policies to both prevent and remediate slope failure including limiting land use, installing culverts, dewatering, and road re-paving. Failed mitigation has resulted from both incomplete geologic studies of the region and public policy incompatible with geologic understanding. In this study, an experimental design assesses how re-pavement of Highway 101 affects the slope stability of the region. Field measurements of asphalt thickness, and cover area will be used to calculate the influence of increased load weight on the slope, and how this affects landslide frequency and magnitude. Results of this experiment can be used to interpret the total long term impacts of current public policies of road remediation versus the higher short term costs of slope mitigation.