Title

Fake Weed, Real Problem

Date

5-30-2013 1:00 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Arlene Courtney

Session Title

Chemistry Capstone Seminars

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Arlene Courtney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Marijuana has proven to be a never ending controversial issue in all aspects of society. Tetrahydrocannabinol, THC, is the active constituent in marijuana. It poses several beneficial uses in medicine and the management of anxiety. Because of its psychoactive nature, THC stimulates hallucinations that can be very dangerous when mixed with the stimulant and depressant effects. Research has aided us with a new class of compounds that mimic the beneficial effects of THC without the hallucinogenic effects-Synthetic Cannabinoids. These compounds were intended for improving medicinal purposes and treatment of AIDS. Slight modifications were made to their structures to study the effect on the receptors in the brain. However, synthetic cannabinoids quickly became a drug of abuse since traditional detection methods used to identify THC no longer work. There is now a demand for new technology in the toxicology field to identify the individual families of synthetic cannabinoids in various specimens.

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May 30th, 1:00 PM

Fake Weed, Real Problem

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Marijuana has proven to be a never ending controversial issue in all aspects of society. Tetrahydrocannabinol, THC, is the active constituent in marijuana. It poses several beneficial uses in medicine and the management of anxiety. Because of its psychoactive nature, THC stimulates hallucinations that can be very dangerous when mixed with the stimulant and depressant effects. Research has aided us with a new class of compounds that mimic the beneficial effects of THC without the hallucinogenic effects-Synthetic Cannabinoids. These compounds were intended for improving medicinal purposes and treatment of AIDS. Slight modifications were made to their structures to study the effect on the receptors in the brain. However, synthetic cannabinoids quickly became a drug of abuse since traditional detection methods used to identify THC no longer work. There is now a demand for new technology in the toxicology field to identify the individual families of synthetic cannabinoids in various specimens.