Title

Activation of antimicrobial peptides via infection of Pseudomonas fluorescens in Drosophila melanogaster

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Drosophila melanogaster is a good model for studying the host immune response, as Drosophila rely solely on their conserved innate immune system. During a Gram-negative bacterial infection, the immune deficiency pathway is activated and antimicrobial peptides are expressed. To study the host-immune response of D. melanogaster larvae, we chose a fly line where two of the antimicrobial peptides were tagged with reporter genes. We infected the larvae with the Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and observed their larval development. We then extracted their fat body, and investigated its antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that P. fluorescens grown in King’s media has an increased toxicity compared to P. fluorescens grown in other types of media. Also, the ingestion of P. fluorescens tends to cause developmental delays or death. We are using the reporter-linked antimicrobial peptides to determine the specific mechanisms of the Drosophila immune response.

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May 30th, 2:00 PM

Activation of antimicrobial peptides via infection of Pseudomonas fluorescens in Drosophila melanogaster

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Drosophila melanogaster is a good model for studying the host immune response, as Drosophila rely solely on their conserved innate immune system. During a Gram-negative bacterial infection, the immune deficiency pathway is activated and antimicrobial peptides are expressed. To study the host-immune response of D. melanogaster larvae, we chose a fly line where two of the antimicrobial peptides were tagged with reporter genes. We infected the larvae with the Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and observed their larval development. We then extracted their fat body, and investigated its antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that P. fluorescens grown in King’s media has an increased toxicity compared to P. fluorescens grown in other types of media. Also, the ingestion of P. fluorescens tends to cause developmental delays or death. We are using the reporter-linked antimicrobial peptides to determine the specific mechanisms of the Drosophila immune response.