Title

Decline in the health and vigor of Oregon white oak

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Oregon white oak (OWO) is a dominant component of savannah and woodland habitats that were once a large part of our landscape. Land use changes have removed much of this habitat and have threatened or endangered species. We hypothesized that changes in competition are associated with decline in OWO vigor. We selected six OWO that were healthy and six that showed declining health. We measured growth and health of each study tree and assessed competition from surrounding trees in a 16 m radius. OWO study trees had similar height, but trees with good health had larger mean trunk width than trees with declining health. Dominance of Douglas firs was high, and tree density was 2.5 times greater in declining OWO plots compared to healthy OWO plots. These results support the hypothesis that shade intolerant OWO are declining as forest density and Douglas fir dominance increases.

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May 30th, 2:00 PM

Decline in the health and vigor of Oregon white oak

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Oregon white oak (OWO) is a dominant component of savannah and woodland habitats that were once a large part of our landscape. Land use changes have removed much of this habitat and have threatened or endangered species. We hypothesized that changes in competition are associated with decline in OWO vigor. We selected six OWO that were healthy and six that showed declining health. We measured growth and health of each study tree and assessed competition from surrounding trees in a 16 m radius. OWO study trees had similar height, but trees with good health had larger mean trunk width than trees with declining health. Dominance of Douglas firs was high, and tree density was 2.5 times greater in declining OWO plots compared to healthy OWO plots. These results support the hypothesis that shade intolerant OWO are declining as forest density and Douglas fir dominance increases.