Title

Nutrient Acquisition's Effect on Gas Exchange Rates in Helianthus annuus

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

To maximize crop productivity it is important to understand mechanisms of nutrient acquisition. We hypothesized that sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) with nutrients segregated from roots would have higher leaf gas exchange rates than those with direct contact between nutrients and roots. To test this, I measured daytime and nighttime gas exchange rates of two age cohorts of sunflowers grown in a greenhouse. Nutrients were applied directly to the soil volume or were sequestered behind a screen. We found no significant difference between the two nutrient treatments for any gas exchange traits during either day or night. However, younger sunflowers had higher gas exchange rates during both day and night, suggesting age has a greater effect on productivity than nutrient distribution.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
May 30th, 2:00 PM

Nutrient Acquisition's Effect on Gas Exchange Rates in Helianthus annuus

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

To maximize crop productivity it is important to understand mechanisms of nutrient acquisition. We hypothesized that sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) with nutrients segregated from roots would have higher leaf gas exchange rates than those with direct contact between nutrients and roots. To test this, I measured daytime and nighttime gas exchange rates of two age cohorts of sunflowers grown in a greenhouse. Nutrients were applied directly to the soil volume or were sequestered behind a screen. We found no significant difference between the two nutrient treatments for any gas exchange traits during either day or night. However, younger sunflowers had higher gas exchange rates during both day and night, suggesting age has a greater effect on productivity than nutrient distribution.