Title

Stomatal Analysis of Native and Invasive Blackberries

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Invasive plants often have larger resource consumption rates than do their native counterparts, potentially enhancing their ability to survive in a new environment. Differences in pore (stomatal) size, shape, and number per unit leaf surface area have not been analyzed. To test these differences, Rubus armeniacus (invasive blackberry) and Rubus ursinus (native blackberry) were grown in a greenhouse. Fully hydrated leaves were collected and surface prints were made and analyzed under a light microscope. Rubus armeniacus and R. ursinus have the same size and shape stomata. Rubus armeniacus had significantly higher stomatal density averaging 74.6 whole stomata/mm2, while the R. ursinus averaged 47.3 whole stomata/mm2.

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May 30th, 2:00 PM

Stomatal Analysis of Native and Invasive Blackberries

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Invasive plants often have larger resource consumption rates than do their native counterparts, potentially enhancing their ability to survive in a new environment. Differences in pore (stomatal) size, shape, and number per unit leaf surface area have not been analyzed. To test these differences, Rubus armeniacus (invasive blackberry) and Rubus ursinus (native blackberry) were grown in a greenhouse. Fully hydrated leaves were collected and surface prints were made and analyzed under a light microscope. Rubus armeniacus and R. ursinus have the same size and shape stomata. Rubus armeniacus had significantly higher stomatal density averaging 74.6 whole stomata/mm2, while the R. ursinus averaged 47.3 whole stomata/mm2.