Title

Assessing Plant Species Diversity in the Luckiamute River Basin, Central Oregon Coast Range

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Patrick Aldrich and Bryan Dutton

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Investigating plant diversity patterns is important for assessing impacts of invasive species on plant communities. Statistical analyses of diversity patterns between native and non-native plant species along the Luckiamute River Basin were conducted to study these impacts. Twenty transects, with up to 100 quadrats, oriented perpendicular to the river or creek channel were analyzed for species diversity, species cover and light abundance. The Shannon Weiner index was used to measure the diversity of species within and between transects. Analyses showed that 22.4% of total species surveyed were not present within the first 29 meters of each transect along the river or creek channel. Boxplots were also generated for a visual comparison between transects and the first quadrat within each transect. These data support the delineation of a riparian and non-riparian zone and suggest that invasive species have differentially impacted native communities resulting in heterogeneous assemblages of native and non-native species throughout the river basin.

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May 30th, 2:00 PM

Assessing Plant Species Diversity in the Luckiamute River Basin, Central Oregon Coast Range

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Investigating plant diversity patterns is important for assessing impacts of invasive species on plant communities. Statistical analyses of diversity patterns between native and non-native plant species along the Luckiamute River Basin were conducted to study these impacts. Twenty transects, with up to 100 quadrats, oriented perpendicular to the river or creek channel were analyzed for species diversity, species cover and light abundance. The Shannon Weiner index was used to measure the diversity of species within and between transects. Analyses showed that 22.4% of total species surveyed were not present within the first 29 meters of each transect along the river or creek channel. Boxplots were also generated for a visual comparison between transects and the first quadrat within each transect. These data support the delineation of a riparian and non-riparian zone and suggest that invasive species have differentially impacted native communities resulting in heterogeneous assemblages of native and non-native species throughout the river basin.