Title

Observing Developmental Delay of Drosophila melanogaster larvae to P. fluorescens Inoculation.

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), have been one of the most thoroughly studied organisms since Thomas Hunt Morgan began his work on their genetics in the early 1900s. Since then, homologies in the innate immune systems of Drosophila have made the study of Drosophila applicable to humans. To study the innate immune system, fruit flies were grown in media inoculated with Pseudomonas fluorescens, a gram-negative bacterium ubiquitous in soil. Depending on the bacterial concentration used, Drosophila exhibit slower larval growth, morphological abnormalities and death. By monitoring the effects P. fluorescens has on Drosophila, insight into the functioning of the human innate immune system may be possible. The goal of this study is to identify the bacterial metabolites responsible for the immune response, eventually leading to the identification of the molecular pathways involved in the innate response.

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May 30th, 2:00 PM

Observing Developmental Delay of Drosophila melanogaster larvae to P. fluorescens Inoculation.

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), have been one of the most thoroughly studied organisms since Thomas Hunt Morgan began his work on their genetics in the early 1900s. Since then, homologies in the innate immune systems of Drosophila have made the study of Drosophila applicable to humans. To study the innate immune system, fruit flies were grown in media inoculated with Pseudomonas fluorescens, a gram-negative bacterium ubiquitous in soil. Depending on the bacterial concentration used, Drosophila exhibit slower larval growth, morphological abnormalities and death. By monitoring the effects P. fluorescens has on Drosophila, insight into the functioning of the human innate immune system may be possible. The goal of this study is to identify the bacterial metabolites responsible for the immune response, eventually leading to the identification of the molecular pathways involved in the innate response.