Title

Effects of foot size on crawling speed in snails using different modes of propulsion

Date

5-30-2013 2:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Michael Baltzley

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Snails exhibit two types of locomotion, muscular waves of the foot and mucociliary propulsion. In groups of snails that use muscular contractions of the foot, crawling speed is positively correlated with size. It has been hypothesized that mucociliary crawlers lack this correlation between foot size and speed, but this has not been tested experimentally. We compared foot size vs. speed in the garden snail Helix aspersa, a muscular crawler, and the mud snail Ilyanassa obsoleta, a mucociliary crawler. We found that H. aspersa showed a slight correlation between foot size and speed while I. obsoleta did not show this relationship. When we compared crawling speed between the species, we found that H. aspersa was significantly faster than I. obsoleta.

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May 30th, 2:00 PM

Effects of foot size on crawling speed in snails using different modes of propulsion

Werner University Center (WUC), Pacific Room

Snails exhibit two types of locomotion, muscular waves of the foot and mucociliary propulsion. In groups of snails that use muscular contractions of the foot, crawling speed is positively correlated with size. It has been hypothesized that mucociliary crawlers lack this correlation between foot size and speed, but this has not been tested experimentally. We compared foot size vs. speed in the garden snail Helix aspersa, a muscular crawler, and the mud snail Ilyanassa obsoleta, a mucociliary crawler. We found that H. aspersa showed a slight correlation between foot size and speed while I. obsoleta did not show this relationship. When we compared crawling speed between the species, we found that H. aspersa was significantly faster than I. obsoleta.